Global Democracy Dialogues: U.S.-Canada Virtual Speaker Series

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A banner displaying the logos of the Global Speaker Series as well as the Parliamentary Centre's.

Register for "A New Architecture for Canada's Democracy Aid?" Today!


International democracy assistance is entering a new era.


The Parliamentary Centre is launching Global Democracy Dialogues to take a bold look at how our sector can rise to the challenge.


Over the last three decades, there has been a sustained international effort to support the emergence of inclusive democracy. However, there is now widespread backsliding and a global crisis of confidence in democracy.


Despite political consensus on its value, Canada’s support for democracy strengthening abroad has steadily declined in the last decade. During the global pandemic, as civic space shrinks, women disproportionately carry the burden and parliaments are sidelined; how political leaders and countries support and defend democracy will determine the extent to which democracy in many parts of the world is renewed or veers backward.


We are pleased to launch the Global Democracy Dialogues with a series of discussions between Canada and the U.S. in partnership with the U.S. Embassy in Ottawa. Over the 12 months, the Parliamentary Centre will convene 13 virtual events bringing together top experts from both sides of the border. Global Democracy Dialogues series takes a deep look at today’s challenges to democracy worldwide and how the U.S., Canada and others can respond.


Through these conversations, we explore ways of advancing our shared values in the world. Topics range from protecting human rights and political and civil liberties against new threats to confronting hostile actors and authoritarian backsliding to considering how feminist approaches to democracy can build a safer and more inclusive world. We also look at the architecture of democracy assistance as a strategic and impactful form of foreign policy and development assistance.


Join us to help shape the way forward for advancing democracy in the world! Stay tuned for regular events. #LetsTalkAboutDemocracy


A Word from Acting Deputy Chief of Mission, Brian Naranjo, and Parliamentary CEO, Tom Cormier:

A Closer Look:

The Global Development Primer

In partnership with the US-Canada Virtual Speaker Series, the Global Development Primer podcast is hosting a special series on democracy assistance in international development. Podcast host and Dalhousie Professor Robert Huish speaks to some of our guests.



CIPS - Centre for International Policy Studies

The University of Ottawa’s Centre for International Policy Studies (CIPS) is featuring a year-long blog series in collaboration with the Global Democracy Dialogues. Authored by CIPS associates and Global Democracy Dialogue experts, the blogs offer insight and fresh analytical perspectives on the range of topics covered by the series.



The U.S. Virtual Speaker Series was funded by a grant from the United States Department of State. The opinions, findings and conclusions stated herein are those of participants and do not necessarily reflect those of the United States Department of State.


Register for "A New Architecture for Canada's Democracy Aid?" Today!


International democracy assistance is entering a new era.


The Parliamentary Centre is launching Global Democracy Dialogues to take a bold look at how our sector can rise to the challenge.


Over the last three decades, there has been a sustained international effort to support the emergence of inclusive democracy. However, there is now widespread backsliding and a global crisis of confidence in democracy.


Despite political consensus on its value, Canada’s support for democracy strengthening abroad has steadily declined in the last decade. During the global pandemic, as civic space shrinks, women disproportionately carry the burden and parliaments are sidelined; how political leaders and countries support and defend democracy will determine the extent to which democracy in many parts of the world is renewed or veers backward.


We are pleased to launch the Global Democracy Dialogues with a series of discussions between Canada and the U.S. in partnership with the U.S. Embassy in Ottawa. Over the 12 months, the Parliamentary Centre will convene 13 virtual events bringing together top experts from both sides of the border. Global Democracy Dialogues series takes a deep look at today’s challenges to democracy worldwide and how the U.S., Canada and others can respond.


Through these conversations, we explore ways of advancing our shared values in the world. Topics range from protecting human rights and political and civil liberties against new threats to confronting hostile actors and authoritarian backsliding to considering how feminist approaches to democracy can build a safer and more inclusive world. We also look at the architecture of democracy assistance as a strategic and impactful form of foreign policy and development assistance.


Join us to help shape the way forward for advancing democracy in the world! Stay tuned for regular events. #LetsTalkAboutDemocracy


A Word from Acting Deputy Chief of Mission, Brian Naranjo, and Parliamentary CEO, Tom Cormier:

A Closer Look:

The Global Development Primer

In partnership with the US-Canada Virtual Speaker Series, the Global Development Primer podcast is hosting a special series on democracy assistance in international development. Podcast host and Dalhousie Professor Robert Huish speaks to some of our guests.



CIPS - Centre for International Policy Studies

The University of Ottawa’s Centre for International Policy Studies (CIPS) is featuring a year-long blog series in collaboration with the Global Democracy Dialogues. Authored by CIPS associates and Global Democracy Dialogue experts, the blogs offer insight and fresh analytical perspectives on the range of topics covered by the series.



The U.S. Virtual Speaker Series was funded by a grant from the United States Department of State. The opinions, findings and conclusions stated herein are those of participants and do not necessarily reflect those of the United States Department of State.